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Posts Tagged ‘Masanobu Fukuoka’

permaculture.co.uk writes…

“Masanobu Fukuoka (1913- 2008) was a Japanese farmer and philosopher who had a huge influence on the permaculture movement worldwide. He developed the theory and practice of ‘A Natural Way of Farming’ that involved minimum intervention from the farmer, and no-till, no-herbicide grain cultivationmethods traditional to many indigenous cultures. He wrote the ever popular seminal book The One Straw Revolution in 1975. It is  a manifesto about farming, food, and a radical challenge to the global systems we rely on for our food. You can download it for free at that link.

From 1979 he travelled the world widely, spreading his philosophy and techniques, and began to apply them to re-greening desert area all over the world. He also re-invented and advanced the use of clay seed balls. His work took him beyond framing and he became an early pioneer of whole foods and a more natural lifestyle. This is a short documentary that introduces Fukuoka and his radical, pioneering ideas that permaculturists are still experimenting with worldwide.

The Rodale Press is part of the Rodale Institute. For more than sixty years, have been researching the best practices of organic agriculture and sharing their findings with farmers and scientists throughout the world, advocating for policies that support farmers, and educating consumers about how going organic is the healthiest option for people and the planet.”

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context.org writes…

…”Several years ago, I travelled around Europe. It seemed to me that Europe was very nice and beautiful, with lots of nature preserved. But three feet under the surface I felt desert slowly coming in. I kept wondering why. I realized it was the mistake they made in agriculture. The beginning of the mistake is from growing meat for the king and wine for the church. All around, cow, cow, cow, grape, grape, grape. European and American agriculture started with grazing cows and growing grapes for the king and the church. They changed nature by doing this, especially on the hill slopes. Then soil erosion occurs. Only the 20% of the soil in the valleys remains healthy, and 80% of the land is depleted….”

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Sustainable Habitat – Buildings, resources & community

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Masanobu Fukuoka

Masanobu Fukuoka

Fraser from ecocentro Senda Verde permacultura blog writes…

“Masanobu Fukuoka 1913 –

Masanobu Fukuoka received the Magsaysay prize for his world-wide contribution to the well-being of mankind in 1988. In the last 20 years he applied his method with the greening of desert areas. In Thailand, the Philippines, India and Africa he transformed smaller devastated areas into varied and green landscapes. The first larger-scale experiment took place in March 1998 in Greece…”

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[ecocentro Senda Verde permacultura blog]

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Bill Mollison and Masanobu Fukuoka

Bill Mollison and Masanobu Fukuoka

Here’s a picture of Bill Mollison, the guy behind the idea, and another amazing human being who was one of Bill’s inspirations, Masanobu Fukuoka.

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[echoleague.wordpress.com]

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“Although natural farming — since it can teach people to cultivate a deep understanding of nature – may lead to spiritual insight, it’s not strictly a spiritual practice. Natural farming is just farming, nothing more. You don’t have to be a spiritually oriented person to practice my methods. Anyone who can approach these concepts with a clear, open mind will be starting off well.”
– Masanobu Fukuoka

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Wikipedia

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