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Posts Tagged ‘Research’

Food forest

Food forest

Intentional earth stewardship by creating an abundant and productive food forest is, in our opinion, essential to comprehensive food sustainability and self-sufficiency. It is also foundational to regenerating our planet and One Community’s Highest Good of All philosophy. For this reason, we are including teaching, demonstrating, and open source sharing food forest creation and development as key components of our open source botanical garden, Highest Good food infrastructure, and model for self-replicating and self-sufficient teacher/demonstration communities, villages, and cities to be built around the world.

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BANANA BASICS

Banana's

Banana’s

This is an excellent guide about everything banana’s!

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Have you ever tried to create a large map from a number of separate images?  Some people take a number of screenshots of a zoomed in area (say Google maps), and then use a some sort of photo editing software to stitch each image together to make a single large image.

This will work of course, but why not use the free Microsoft Image Composite Editor?

What is Image Composite Editor?

Microsoft Image Composite Editor is an advanced panoramic image stitcher. Given a set of overlapping photographs of a scene shot from a single camera location, the application creates a high-resolution panorama that seamlessly combines the original images. The stitched panorama can be shared with friends and viewed in 3D by uploading it to the Photosynth web site. Or the panorama can be saved in a wide variety of image formats, from common formats like JPEG and TIFF to the multiresolution tiled format used by Silverlight’s Deep Zoom and by the HD View andHD View SL panorama viewers.

 New features in version 1.4.4

  • Stitch directly from a video (only on Windows 7)
  • Automatic lens vignette removal
  • Improved blending engine
  • Options dialogue to control memory usage and scratch disk locations

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Milkwood writes…

“Choosing the right plant for the right spot, working with its behaviours and getting it to cooperate with others can be a little difficult at times.  Before you go getting yourself a little too lost in the world of plants (actually that sounds pretty darn good) take a look at these five plant databases…”

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ngm.nationalgeographic.com – National Geographic Society

Explore the world’s new coastlines if sea level rises 216 feet. The maps here show the world as it is now, with only one difference: All the ice on land has melted and drained into the sea, raising it 216 feet and creating new shorelines for our continents and inland seas.  There are more than five million cubic miles of ice on Earth, and some scientists say it would take more than 5,000 years to melt it all. If we continue adding carbon to the atmosphere, we’ll very likely create an ice-free planet, with an average temperature of perhaps 80 degrees Fahrenheit instead of the current 58.

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Theatlantic.com writes…

“Meet ‘photoswitches,’ a breakthrough set of materials that act as their own batteries, absorbing energy and releasing it on demand.

Andres Gutierrez/AP

Andres Gutierrez/AP

 

The next big thing in solar energy could be microscopic.

Scientists at MIT and Harvard University have devised a way to store solar energy in molecules that can then be tapped to heat homes, water or used for cooking.

The best part: The molecules can store the heat forever and be endlessly re-used while emitting absolutely no greenhouse gases.  Scientists remain a way’s off in building this perpetual heat machine but they have succeeded in the laboratory at demonstrating the viability of the phenomenon called photoswitching…”

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larrakia.csiro.au writes…

Traditional knowledge can tell us much about the ecology of northern Australia. CSIRO, as part of the Tropical Rivers and Coastal Knowledge program, worked with six language groups – the Gooniyandi and Walmajarri from the Fitzroy River area in the Kimberley region of Western Australia, the Ngan’gi, Malakmalak and Wagiman from the Daly River region in the Northern Territory, and the Gulumoerrgin/Larrakia from the Darwin region – over five years to develop a series of calendars representing Aboriginal seasonal knowledge.

Gulumoerrgin (Larrakia) Seasons

 

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