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Toby Hemenway was born on April 23, 1952 and died on December 20, 2016.

He was an American author and educator.

Hemenway has written extensively on permaculture and ecological issues.

Hemenway was the author of Gaia’s Garden: A Guide to Home-Scale Permaculture and The Permaculture City: Regenerative Design for Urban, Suburban, and Town Resilience.

Hemenway served as an adjunct professor at Portland State University, Scholar-in-Residence at Pacific University, and a field director at the Permaculture Institute (USA).

When he had obtained his degree in biology from Tufts University, Toby worked for many years as a researcher in genetics and immunology, first in academic laboratories including Harvard and the University of Washington in Seattle, and then at Immunex, a major medical biotech company.

Toby Hemenway passed away at 64 years old.

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abc.net.au writes…

“A radical environmental approach to holding water in leaky weirs on a farm — one of only five in the world — has been recognised by the United Nations as sustainable.

Mulloon Creek, near Braidwood in New South Wales, uses the Peter Andrews method of Natural Sequence Farming — growing weeds and slowing the movement of water in the landscape.

The farm has proved itself in the past seven years, increasing pasture growth through the drought and feeding more cattle.

The farm was run down before the owner, Tony Coote, adopted Mr Andrews’s methods to rehydrate the land.

As it sits at the headwater of the Shoalhaven River, it feeds into the Sydney Water Catchment.

“We are making more sustainable agriculture, improving the environment, [producing] cleaner water,” Mulloon Institute chairman Gary Nairn said.

Having left federal politics, Mr Nairn has taken over running the institute that hosts workshops and field days on the farm…”

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bluemountainspermacultureinstitute.com.au writes…

“We are happy to announce the release of the NEW book: Permaculture Teaching Matters, written by Rosemary Morrow and designed by Alba Teixidor.

This book was funded by a crowdfunding campaign early in 2015. It is a step by step guide to assist holders of a PDC to become effective and inspiring teachers. We look forward to them training the next generation of permaculture practitioners.”

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‘What is the difference between permaculture design and landscape design?’. This is a common question when people are first developing an understanding of permaculture design. It’s a good question!

Permaculture design goes deeper than landscape design. While both seek to create a functional and aesthetically pleasing environment, permaculture design thinks beyond the boundaries of your block. It aims to create connections that will sustain the design well beyond a lifestyle trend. The result is natural and urban elements that are better able to co-exist.

Permaculture design is systems thinking that can be applied to many situations beyond landscape garden design. This depth contributes to conditions that support permanent culture or as we know it, permaculture.

Let’s explore the difference between permaculture design and landscape design. Here are three points that make permaculture design stand out for us…

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permacultureapprentice.com writes…

“Now that I have seven acres of countryside to steward, I’m feeling somewhat overwhelmed about where to begin. I’ve done my PDC and designed my property, but now I have all these pieces that I somehow need to fit together and I need to prioritise my tasks.

The problem is that permaculture is a set of principles, not a framework. While it is certainly a process, it lacks a set of linear steps to follow. Clearly, what permaculture lacks  is a clear decision-making process.

Taking a PDC doesn’t solve the issue, while it helps with the design phase and developing a site plan, what is frequently ignored is “how to install the design”.

It is most manageable when the design is implemented in stages which build upon each other. That’s why, having taken some time to read up more on the subject, I have created a multi-stage plan based upon the components of the ‘keyline scale of permanence’

This helps me develop my design incrementally, envisage the ‘big picture’ and, most importantly, I have an order in which to establish my farm.

In this post, I’ll share some advice on beginning your farm’s development and on how to implement your design in stages. Even if you haven’t yet designed your property you can still follow the process. Let’s dive in…”

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