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permaculture.co.uk writes…

“Masanobu Fukuoka (1913- 2008) was a Japanese farmer and philosopher who had a huge influence on the permaculture movement worldwide. He developed the theory and practice of ‘A Natural Way of Farming’ that involved minimum intervention from the farmer, and no-till, no-herbicide grain cultivationmethods traditional to many indigenous cultures. He wrote the ever popular seminal book The One Straw Revolution in 1975. It is  a manifesto about farming, food, and a radical challenge to the global systems we rely on for our food. You can download it for free at that link.

From 1979 he travelled the world widely, spreading his philosophy and techniques, and began to apply them to re-greening desert area all over the world. He also re-invented and advanced the use of clay seed balls. His work took him beyond framing and he became an early pioneer of whole foods and a more natural lifestyle. This is a short documentary that introduces Fukuoka and his radical, pioneering ideas that permaculturists are still experimenting with worldwide.

The Rodale Press is part of the Rodale Institute. For more than sixty years, have been researching the best practices of organic agriculture and sharing their findings with farmers and scientists throughout the world, advocating for policies that support farmers, and educating consumers about how going organic is the healthiest option for people and the planet.”

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On a lovely early summer evening at Yandoit Farm in central Victoria, Permaculture co-originator David Holmgren, Very Edible Gardens Director and PermaBlitz co-founder Dan Palmer & Regrarians Director Darren Doherty discuss with Regrarians’ Lisa Heenan the benefits of cooperation for local enterprises, the use of swales and a few other issues.

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David Holmgren talks collapse at the Sustainable Living Festival Great Debate

The full event can be view here: https://vimeo.com/119722889

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Treehugger.com writes…

“Growers in colder climates often utilize various approaches to extend the growing season or to give their crops a boost, whether it’s coldframeshoop houses or greenhouses.

Greenhouses are usually glazed structures, but are typically expensive to construct and heat throughout the winter. A much more affordable and effective alternative to glass greenhouses is the walipini (an Aymara Indian word for a “place of warmth”), also known as an underground or pit greenhouse. First developed over 20 years ago for the cold mountainous regions of South America, this method allows growers to maintain a productive garden year-round, even in the coldest of climates.

Here’s a video tour of a walipini that even incorporates a bit of interior space for goats:…”

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thingiverse.com writes…

“For less than just one penny a day, you can: grow your own fresh, organic foods and do something good for the environment by recycling plastic bottles; reduce food waste by picking only what you’ll consume; and do so even in a small city apartment. It can all be done using 3Dponics…”

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