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Archive for April, 2013

Types of Water Bodies

Lakescientist.com writes…

…River systems make up about 0.0001% of the Earth’s water. While this may not seem like much, rivers drain more than 75% of the Earth’s surface. Rain and other types of precipitation move water overland, through terrestrial ecosystems and into river systems. The resulting runoff brings inputs of sediments, nutrients, and materials into the river, causing running waters to be highly influenced by their surrounding landscapes (see land use and runoff). The flow of river systems carries the sediments, nutrients, and other materials through the landscape and into other systems, providing vital linkages between the land, lakes, wetlands and oceans. It is because of this that rivers are often referred to as the environment’s circulatory system…”

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Permaculture Magazine UK…

“Take a journey through Alex Ojeda’s Zone 1 permaculture garden. Traditionally, both front and rear gardens take the form of monocultures with lawns being the preferred garden style, and even less cared for is the front garden, which people usually shy away from due to its lack of privacy.  In this video, the front garden takes pride of place and demonstrates the incredible achievements of a functional permaculture system. Alex describes this system as the “encyclopedia of everything our ancestors learned, but updated to be focused and modern […] to holistically manage a piece of property […] and/or preferably the earth.”  Here he describes the process of growing soil and thus improving the quantity and quality of micro-organism as well as natural water retention, which he claims is the reason he does not need to water his garden. A perfect example of minimum human input, which still manages to produce a high crop output with minimum waste.  With references to forest gardening; Hugulkultur, Masanobu Fukuoka and Bill Mollisson, this is a superb video to inspire you to make your front garden a beautiful and productive permaculture space.”

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northforkpermaculture.com writes…

“I liken the relationship of the design process to a tree growing, both non-liner and cyclical. The roots, below ground are the developmental phase, planning and thought.  There are main “root” branches to be developed as well as design methods to help in each area. The leaves represent the application or action phase and specific results. Yields and results can be shared, but only after achieving them.   The process in general moves between two poles or phases, internal and external, planning and application. It also cycles around the “seed” of a goal or vision at the center:  observing, developing, refining and applying….”

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Temperate Climate Permaculture writes…

In Permaculture, a swale is a method used to harvest rain water.  They are long shallow trenches that run along the contour of the land.  This means that swales are perfectly level.  Swales do not direct water flow, but they collect water.  The soil removed from the swale is piled on the downhill side to make a slightly raised bank or berm.  When rain falls, the water runs along the surface of the topsoil, and it will collect in the depression of a swale.  The water will slowly seep into the soil and collect in underground pockets that will supply the roots of plants through weeks and even months without rain…

Illustration showing the water storage of a swale – from Gaia’s Garden

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midwestpermaculture resource page and ebooks.

Plant Guilds

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Milkwood writes…

“Afristar Foundation utilises Permaculture design systems as the primary methodology of our community development strategy. Permaculture is an optimistic, action-oriented approach to the environmental, energy, food, water and climate crisis the world is currently facing. Its adaptibility and emphasis on meeting human needs means that it can be utilised in every climatic and cultural zone…”

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Hadley’s model

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