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Archive for August, 2009

Vertical garden

Vertical garden

When Patrick Blanc was a boy, he suspended plants from his bedroom wall and ran their roots into a fish tank. The greenery received nourishment from the diluted—ahem—fertilizer and purified the water in return. Forty-five years on, the French botanist’s gardens have grown massive in scale. One inside a Portuguese shopping mall is larger than four tennis courts, and there’s one in Kuwait that’s almost as big. But Blanc’s recently completed facade for the Athenaeum hotel in London (shown) could be his most high-profile project yet. Looming over Green Park, it’s an eight-story antigravity forest composed of 12,000 plants.

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Garlic is a staple of companion planting. It produces a natural fungicide that benefits many plants in organic gardens and repels many pests.With a little planning, the organic garden will benefit immensely from garlic.

Things You Will Need

  • Garlic
  • Garden gloves
  • Garden hose
  • Garden Spade

Step 1

Plan your garden, herb and flower bed ahead of time because garlic should be planted in the fall. Use markers to identify where you have planted garlic so as not to disturb them in the spring when you begin to plant companion plants near them.

Step 2

Plant garlic bulbs near roses. In the organic garden, garlic assists roses with disease prevention, repels aphids, ants, snails and other pests.

Step 3

Plant garlic as a beneficial companion to vegetables such as spinach, potatoes, eggplant, tomatoes, peppers, cabbage, broccoli and kohlrabi to fend off aphids, cabbage worms, slugs and other pests. Plant garlic and carrots together to confuse carrot flies and avoid root maggots. Garlic and beets are beneficial to each other in fending off various leaf hoppers, destructive worms and flying pests. Garlic repels fungus gnats, codling moths, cabbage loopers and Japanese beetles in an organic garden.

Step 4

Plant garlic amongst herbs such as yarrow, summer savory, rue, chamomile and dill. Garlic will repel spider mites for dill. Rue deters maggots for garlic. Yarrow and summer savory improve the overall health and production of garlic and chamomile will improve its flavor.

Step 5

Plant garlic with flower companions such as marigold, nasturtium, geranium and petunias to repel pests above and below ground. Garlic will also aid in deterring pests from these flowers in an organic garden. Deer and rabbits may also stay away from flowers when garlic is used as a companion plant.

Step 6

Plant garlic away from where beans, peas, parsley and sage are going to be planted. These plants will be harmed by the closeness of garlic.

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Wild Fire

Wild Fire

This post focuses on the factors that we believe helped save our place and includes aspects of our permaculture design intended to reduce the threat, as well as what we learned from our recent experience. Comments relate specifically to our location and personal observations, and may not apply under different conditions.

House design

Our house is mudbrick with small amounts of exposed timber and built on a slab. Embers blown up against the exposed slab are easily spotted and extinguished. Exposed timber surfaces are smooth so embers blow off. We kept the house profile low so that a firestorm’s embers and radiant heat would largely pass overhead. Before and during the fire we continually wetted down external surfaces-especially vulnerable parts of the roof structure. The eastern wall is earth covered, giving that wall more protection and allowing us to gain quick access to the roof.

On the northern side (the most likely direction of a firestorm) the bulk of the forest is 80m away. We located our dam and vegetable patch between us and the forest to create a low risk buffer. As fires tend to race up slopes we built our house on an area with a low gradient. Our orchard is located to the northeast of the house providing another green buffer and a wide driveway with cleared sides provides a firebreak to the west and south. This photo is taken from our roof looking north. The burnt forest can be seen on the other side of the dam.

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Regional guides

Discover the regions of your state then find the frogs of a particular region.

Frog

Frog

Frogs of Australia

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Rightlivelihood.org

Rightlivelihood.org

The Right Livelihood Award honours and supports those offering practical and exemplary answers to the most urgent challenges facing us today.

In many countries, the Award is often referred to as the ‘Alternative Nobel Prize’.

“I grew up in a small village in Tasmania. I was born in 1928, but my village might have existed in the 11th century. We didn’t have any cars; everything that we needed we made. We made our own boots, our own metal works, we caught fish, grew food, made bread. I didn’t know anybody who lived there who had one job, or anything that you could define as a job. Everybody had several jobs.
As a child I lived in a sort of a dream and I didn’t really awake until I was about 28. I spent most of my working life in the bush or on the sea. I fished, I hunted for my living. It wasn’t until the 1950s that large parts of the system in which I lived were disappearing. First, fish stocks became extinct. Then I noticed the seaweed around the shorelines had gone. Large patches of forest began to die. I hadn’t realised until those things were gone that I’d become very fond of them, that I was in love with my country. This is about the last place I want to be; I would like to be sitting in the bush watching wallabies. However, if I don’t stand here there will be no bush and no wallabies to watch. The Japanese have come to take away most of our forest. They are using it for newsprint. I notice that you are putting it in your waste‑paper basket. That’s what has happened to the life systems I grew up in.”

Bill Mollison 1981 Acceptance Speech

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NRCS

NRCS

The PLANTS Database provides standardized information about the vascular plants, mosses, liverworts, hornworts, and lichens of the U.S. and its territories. It includes names, plant symbols, checklists, distributional data, species abstracts, characteristics, images, crop information, automated tools, onward Web links, and references. This information primarily promotes land conservation in the United States and its territories, but academic, educational, and general use is encouraged. PLANTS reduces government spending by minimizing duplication and making information exchange possible across agencies and disciplines.

Part A: PLANTS Core Data
1. Distribution
2. Taxonomy
3. Ecology
4. Legal Status
5. Additional Information in PLANTS
Part B: Characteristics Data
1. Morphology/Physiology
2. Growth Requirements
3. Reproduction
4. Suitability/Use

Part A: PLANTS Core Data

1. Distribution

2. Taxonomy

3. Ecology

4. Legal Status

5. Additional Information in PLANTS

Part B: Characteristics Data

1. Morphology/Physiology

2. Growth Requirements

3. Reproduction

4. Suitability/Use

Advance Plant Search

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Wonderwheel

Wonderwheel

Trying to research on Google Permaculture material? Why not see the results in a Google “Wonder Wheel”?

The “Wonder Wheel” is like a mindmap result search view.

Just click on the key word you are interested to see related search results shown on the right hand side of the screen.

You can filter the results by selecting the right option on the left hand side screen options.

Try it out here

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