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Posts Tagged ‘Sepp Holzer’

Hugelkultur is raised garden beds that reduce or eliminate the need for irrigation and fertilizer.

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permaculture.co.uk writes…

“Sepp Holzer and Bernd Müller  explain how a water retention landscape is constructed and the dramatic effects a landscape of this kind can have in a short time, even in an area that is being desertified using the Tamera ecovillage as an example. Sepp Holzer’s incredible work offers a local and natural solution to the global problem of water shortages, landscape erosion and polution…”

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richsoil.com writes…

Raised garden bed

Raised garden bed

“It’s a german word and some people can say it all german-ish. I’m an american doofus, so I say “hoogle culture”. I had to spend some time with google to find the right spelling. Hugal, hoogal, huegal, hugel …. And I really like saying it out loud: “hugelkultur, hoogle culture, hoogal kulture ….” – it could be a chant or something.

I learned this high-falootin word at my permaculture training. I also saw it demonstrated on the Sepp Holzer terraces and raised beds video – he didn’t call it hugelkultur, but he was doing it.

Hugelkultur is nothing more than making raised garden beds filled with rotten wood. This makes for raised garden beds loaded with organic material, nutrients, air pockets for the roots of what you plant, etc. As the years pass, the deep soil of your raised garden bed becomes incredibly rich and loaded with soil life. As the wood shrinks, it makes more tiny air pockets – so your hugelkultur becomes sort of self tilling. The first few years, the composting process will slightly warm your soil giving you a slightly longer growing season. The woody matter helps to keep nutrient excess from passing into the ground water – and then refeeding that to your garden plants later. Plus, by holding SO much water, hugelkultur could be part of a system for growing garden crops in the desert with no irrigation…”

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richsoil.com writes…

“A bit of breakfast with Larry Korn in Ashland, Oregon. Larry was an intern for Masaobu Fukuoka for several years and did the translation for One Straw Revolution.
Larry starts off talking about the time that Bill Mollison (the inventor of permaculture) first met Fukuoka.
Larry conveys Fukuokas position on lawns, apple trees, rice, seed balls, desert, agriculture, building soil, feed the world, organic farming, pruning, Sepp Holzer, burdock, dandelion, daikon radish, buckwheat, mustard, white clover, compost, chop and drop, tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, grapes, squash, chickens and much, much more.
Jocelyn Campbell of jocelynsevents.com helps with this podcast.”

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