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Archive for November, 2010

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Kippen House

Kippen House

gizmag.com writes…

“Having chickens and vegetables in your backyard is great for self-sustainability, but what if I want both in a small space? Seattle-based architect turned-self-starter Traci Fontyn has the solution in the form of the Kippen House; a modular chicken coop with a rooftop vegetable garden that creates a looped ecosystem to benefit both your home-grown veggies and eggs.”

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Joel Salatin is an American farmer, lecturer, and author.

Tonight I meet Joel at his lecture in Sydney.  If you ever get the chance to meet him like I did, please do so.  His talk was both inspiring, as well as entertaining.

Here is a video to give you the essence of what he had to say.

Thank you Milkwoodpermaculture.com.au and Sydney Food Fairness Alliance for such a great event.


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permaculture.org.uk writes

“There’s never been a more exciting time to be involved in permaculture. Things have changed enormously over the last few years, and it is now easier than ever to learn about permaculture, and get support for all the practical things you need to do to reduce your eco-footprint, and get started on a permaculture project at home or in your community.

There are many simple ways that you can reduce your impact on the Earth, and improve your quality of life. Read a permaculture book, attend a course or get involved with local projects to find out more. The following list includes actions which will help to significantly reduce your impact on the earth…”

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Jane de Graaf writes from G Magazine…

“Put the ideas of this gardening philosophy to practice in your own backyard with these handy pointers.

I’m standing in the backyard in the pouring rain, watching intently. It sounds odd, but I have good reason. What I’m looking at is water-flow: what happens when the falling drops hit the ground, where the water travels to, whether it pools or disappears. This way I can see if it’s getting to the places that I want it to, minimising resource waste, recycling and diverting water that might otherwise run down the drain. It’s just one aspect of the permaculture concept.

The permaculture movement started in Tasmania in the 1970s and is credited to the developments of Bill Mollison and David Holmgren …”

[G Magazine]

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