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Milkwood writes…

How to string up your tomatos

How to string up your tomatos

“String em up, baby! Climbing tomatoes often need a helping hand to reach their full potential. Here’s our two favourite methods for stringing up best ever backyard toms.

Farm or patio, tomatoes are the go. I can’t imagine summer without them.

In a small backyard like the one we’re living in just now, climbing tomatoes make lots of sense – it’s a chance to make the most of the vertical space along our back fence for growing as much food as we can fit in.

There’s a gazillion ways you can help tomatoes to climb – I grew up with the tomato stake method.

But these days, following a few years of growing in serious quantities, we’ve borrowed a few market gardening tomato tricks for climbers, to apply to our back fence…”

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Posted on October 12th, 2014 by Leon in Survival Equipment

“…“I spent many years in masonry construction. Chimneys and fireplaces were our specialty.
“Fireplace construction uses firebrick for the firebox and ceramic flueliners to carry the heated air out of your house.
It would take very intense heat for a concrete block to “explode”. (Think cutting torch temperatures). Over time,they will deteriorate with heat. As mentioned below, the yellow fire brick, or chimney brick, is the only brick to use. They do not absorb heat. Not sure on the cost but it would be money well spent.
“If you are just occasionally using a rocket stove, you should be ok with regular brick/block.
“Also, if you are building a “permanent” rocket stove, don’t use regular brick mortar for the fire brick. You will need a small bag of “fire clay”. You mix with water just like mortar…”

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Food forest

Food forest

Intentional earth stewardship by creating an abundant and productive food forest is, in our opinion, essential to comprehensive food sustainability and self-sufficiency. It is also foundational to regenerating our planet and One Community’s Highest Good of All philosophy. For this reason, we are including teaching, demonstrating, and open source sharing food forest creation and development as key components of our open source botanical garden, Highest Good food infrastructure, and model for self-replicating and self-sufficient teacher/demonstration communities, villages, and cities to be built around the world.

Source

BANANA BASICS

Banana's

Banana’s

This is an excellent guide about everything banana’s!

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Have you ever tried to create a large map from a number of separate images?  Some people take a number of screenshots of a zoomed in area (say Google maps), and then use a some sort of photo editing software to stitch each image together to make a single large image.

This will work of course, but why not use the free Microsoft Image Composite Editor?

What is Image Composite Editor?

Microsoft Image Composite Editor is an advanced panoramic image stitcher. Given a set of overlapping photographs of a scene shot from a single camera location, the application creates a high-resolution panorama that seamlessly combines the original images. The stitched panorama can be shared with friends and viewed in 3D by uploading it to the Photosynth web site. Or the panorama can be saved in a wide variety of image formats, from common formats like JPEG and TIFF to the multiresolution tiled format used by Silverlight’s Deep Zoom and by the HD View andHD View SL panorama viewers.

 New features in version 1.4.4

  • Stitch directly from a video (only on Windows 7)
  • Automatic lens vignette removal
  • Improved blending engine
  • Options dialogue to control memory usage and scratch disk locations

Source

Treehugger.com writes…

“Growers in colder climates often utilize various approaches to extend the growing season or to give their crops a boost, whether it’s coldframeshoop houses or greenhouses.

Greenhouses are usually glazed structures, but are typically expensive to construct and heat throughout the winter. A much more affordable and effective alternative to glass greenhouses is the walipini (an Aymara Indian word for a “place of warmth”), also known as an underground or pit greenhouse. First developed over 20 years ago for the cold mountainous regions of South America, this method allows growers to maintain a productive garden year-round, even in the coldest of climates.

Here’s a video tour of a walipini that even incorporates a bit of interior space for goats:…”

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